Category : Images we Love

Heads of State on ThingLink

Can you guess how many heads of state have published or appeared in ThingLink news images? Mexico, United States, Spain, The Vatican, and France, to name a few. Here is how interactive images can enrich governmental communication.

As presidential campaigns and governmental communication transitions to social media, heads of state are taking advantage of new photo sharing tools like ThingLink. The President of Mexico, Enrique Peña Nieto uses ThingLink for summarizing weekly activities in informative photo collages containing links to the government’s website, videos, Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.

Mexico – President Enrique Peña Nieto 

Official images of politically important figures are often planned to the smallest detail. Huffington Post tagged an image of His Majesty King Juan Carlos describing the objects in the picture.

Spain – His Majesty King Juan Carlos (from Huffington Post)

President Obama’s campaign team enriched an image of a dinner with the President giving context of the discussion and participants.

United StatesPresident Barack Obama

Editorial images of political figures can turn into infographics that combine visual and textual information in a new way. El Observador used ThingLink to add quotes from various interviews with Pope Francis, the head of the Vatican State and the Catholic Church.

El Observador

Do you represent a governmental organization interested in using ThingLink? Contact info@thinglink.com for further information.

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ThingLink supports educational institutions and non-profits.

In the past months an increasing number of educational and non-profit organizations have discovered ThingLink and started using it on their websites and social media channels.

For example, Medicines Sans Frontiers UK uses ThingLink for embedding educational videos on top of images on their website.

 

 
Organizations like Little Kids Rock have introduced new ways for fundraising through images by using a special donation tag with a direct link to their donation site.

We at ThingLink are committed to supporting schools, teachers, librarians, students and non-profit institutions with robust accounts that enable creative and productive uses of interactive images.

We appreciate educators like Donna Baumbach (@AuntyTech), Susan Oxnevad (@soxnevad), Jamie Forshey (@edutech20) and many others, who constantly share new ways of using ThingLink to engage students in visual storytelling and activities that support the Common Core.

If you are working in the education and non-profit sectors, please ask for a free account upgrade. Mention your school or organization. Write to education@ThingLink.com.

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ThingLink launches Remix – Make any Image a Conversation

ThingLink just launched a new feature called Remix. Now you can create your own version of an image you see. Here’s our CEO Ulla Engeström explaining Remix. Have a question on Remix? Write ulla (at) thinglink.com.
remix-icon

What is a Remix?
In music a remix is a song that has been edited to sound different from the original version — it may include additional effects and elements, or the composition of the elements has been changed.

ThingLink’s Remix feature follows the same idea with images. A rich media image is always a composition of content that conveys a unique experience. Now you can take an image you see, click the Remix button, add elements to it, and republish a new version. By doing so, you’re enabling a new conversation on the same image.

How does it work?
We added a new icon symbol on the right of the image called “Remix”. When you’re viewing a ThingLink image that has enabled remixing, you see a Remix icon on the right. Clicking the icon automatically creates a version of that image in your own account that you can edit. The existing tags will appear, but you can change them and add your own. Your tags will not show in the original image, but your remixed version appears in the comments of the original image.

Screen Shot 2013-03-20 at 3.49.33 PM

How can Remix be used in music?
A band launches a new album. They post an interactive image of the album cover with music and video players. They ask fans to remix additional content on top of it. Fans can just click the Remix button for creating their own version of the album cover, tag it with their favorite content of the band, and share it to social media with the #band name. Often there’s an incentive for participation.

How can Remix be used in schools?
A teacher composes a set of questions on a ThingLink image of a garden with various plants. A student can click the Remix button, and answer the questions on her own version of the image.

How do you use Remix?
I’m a big fan of cool interiors and vintage objects, and I like learning about makers, designers, and manufacturers. With ThingLink’s I can post specific questions directly to images and viewers can Remix the image to add comments and links.

Will Remix change the original image?
No, the original image stays the same. With Remix you just create your own version of it.

How can I follow the versions that other people have created of my image?
All the remixed versions of the original image appear as comments under the original image. This way remixing images builds a conversation.

How can I enable or disable Remix for my images?

Remix feature is automatically enabled for all new users. Existing users can turn on the feature from their settings. Choose Settings → Miscellaneous, and click the box to enable/disable Remix.

If you are excited about Remix and want to build a cool campaign around it, contact us sales@thinglink.com! Now your images can tell new stories!

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Stephen King’s Doctor Sleep

Touch and discover…

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Sports Illustrated Rolls out Swimsuit Issue on ThingLink

How can one make perfection even more? Make your images interactive and tell a deeper story. Check out the new Sports Illustrated Swimsuit issue and model Cintia Dicker below.

 

Model Cintia Dicker in Africa

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Sports Comes Alive on ThingLink

Whether you’re reporting sports or attending a college sports event, you can make the best moments in sports come alive with ThingLink.  Here are images we love by Sports Illustrated, USA TODAY Sports, adidas, LA Times and University of Memphis Baseball.

Tag your favorite sports images at ThingLink.com.

Sports Illustrated on ThingLink

 

USA TODAY Sports on ThingLink

  adidas on ThingLink  

Los Angeles Times on ThingLink


University of Memphis Baseball on ThingLink

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Great meeting you at SxSW2013!

We had a great time at SxSW meeting so many ThingLink users among musicians, film makers, brands and agencies.

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ThingLink at SxSW13 – Booth 511

Looking forward to seeing our friends at SxSW Interactive next week.url

Stop by at Booth 511 and chat it up with our CMO Neil Vineberg.

And if you’re into hearing great bands the place to be is SonyCity at the Hanger Lounge and the Six Lounge (318/319 Colorado at 4th) from March 13-16. Check the calendar for March 13th in the images below.

Big congrats to our friends at Wind-up Records (!!) who are hosting their 15th Anniversary party on March 14th at Empire Control Room.  And check out The Lone Bellow (see image below) performing all over Austin.

Touch and discover the images. Have fun and see you there!

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An Educational Use of Thinglink

Here is a guest post by Michael Britt, Ph.D., host of The Psych Files, a Psychology podcast. The Psych Files is aimed at anyone curious about human behavior, though students taking a course in psychology, those majoring in psychology, and instructors of psychology will find the podcast particularly of interest.

B.F. Skinner in His Own Words

I just finished a fun project using thinglink. Here’s the project:

 

http://www.thinglink.com/scene/366016018553765889#tlsite

 

My goal was to better understand what psychologist B.F. Skinner actually said about educating children, learning to play an instrument, happiness, etc.   I put together a little “audio collage” that students could put together as a class project using any well known person (for whom there is video and/or audio interviews available of course).

Here’s how I created it:

  • Audio bytes were found all over the web – YouTube of course and archive.org
  • I used an audio capture tool (Audio Hijack in my case, but many such programs exist) to grab the audio as it played in my browser
  • I edited the audio down to the essential quotes using an audio editing tool (the free Audacity tool would be fine)
  • Uploaded the audio to my www.soundcloud.com account
  • Created a simple collage using Photoshop (any image editor would work) and arranging images I found from wikipedia and clipart.com
  • After uploading the collage to www.thinglink.com, I linked the audio from Soundcloud to the various spots on the collage

What’s the pedagogical goal? Well, I personally gained a deeper understanding of and appreciation for Skinner and I think students would also gain such an understanding of whoever they chose to focus on.  Also, in addition to just linking from a spot on the image to an audio sound byte, note that there is a small amount of text that can be typed next to the audio player.  Students could be required to tell the listener why the quote is important – what does it reveal about the psychologist’s theory?  What misconception does the quote clarify?  What does the quote reveal about the psychologist as a person?  Also, if the creator of the thinglink enables it, other students can leave comments on the image as well, which could result in a nice discussion and of course a good learning experience for everyone.

I really love Thinglink – such a fun tool.

Michael A. Britt, Ph.D.

http://www.ThePsychFiles.com

Twitter: @mbritt

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ThingLink’s Jonas Forth Discusses How Web Apps Serve the Music Industry

Excerpted from HYPEBOT…An interview with Andrew Apanov of Dotted Music and Stand Above The Noise.

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