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Thinglink users

Meet ThingLink EDU Community Members

Join talented members of the ThingLink EDU Community for a ThingLink Interactive Image Slam tonight at 7:00 PM EDT. Get inspired by the images of others and sign up to for a chance to slam one of your own. Collaborate with participants, ask questions and expand your PLN 

Tonight’s Panelists

Join the Conversation

Join the backchannel on TitanPad

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ThingLink channels have just gotten better! Now ThingLink users can curate and create collections of anyone’s images with a new Add to Channel button available under every public ThingLink image. This feature allows users to easily add anyone’s image to their own channel.

Add Any Image to Your Channel

Now when users view any image on ThingLink EDU, the Add to Channel link appears below it. Just click on the link and add that image to any of your channels.

Add to Channel

Ways to Use Add to Channel

  • Collect and curate content of all kinds.
  • Create a collection of interactive images to build concepts or launch a project.
  • Share and reuse images created by members of your PLN.
  • Redesign curriculum by creating interactive learning guides.
  • Quickly capture links to student assignments and assemble them into organized channel.

Integrate a Google Form

I tested the usefulness of this feature when assembling a channel of interactive images for our ThingLink Interactive Image Slam yesterday. The links to images for sharing during the broadcast were collected through a Google Form. Clicking on the link in the form took me straight to the image I needed. I clicked on Add to Channel and voila, an instant  collection of images was created! Explore this example and enjoy this new ThingLink feature.

 

Interactive Image Slam Channel

Explore the images created and shared by talented members of the ThingLink EDU Community during the first interactive image slam. If you have a great image to share and would like to participate in a future image slam, please fill out the form found in the channel.

Watch this channel grow as more images are added and recorded video from the broadcast is tagged on top of the images!

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Efficient Ways to Manage ThingLink EDU in the Classroom

ThingLink EDU is has many features to help teachers efficiently manage a safe and secure ThingLink powered online learning environment. Google Drive is an  efficient tool for organizing and managing  the workflow in a ThingLink powered classroom. Together these two tools are unbeatable for managing a multi media rich learning environment.

Collect, sort and view all student work in one place!

We’re hosting a free webinar designed to provide busy teachers with an overview of the features available in ThingLink and ways to put them to use. Discover how to use Google Docs to automate tasks within this digital learning environment. Learn to seamlessly integrate ThingLink EDU into your own classroom.

 

Explore This Interactive Image

Spend less time figuring things out on your own and more time leveraging the power of ThingLink as a tool for teaching and learning. Scroll over the image to sign up for Build Your ThingLink Classroom: Tips & Tricks for Teachers today!

 

Time Restrictions?

This webinar will be archived for registered participants who are unable to attend the live session due to time restrictions. Please register to receive resources and archived webinar via email.

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Great news! ThingLink now supports a rich-media tag to embed a Google Doc right on an interactive graphic. Now it’s easier than ever to transform teaching and learning with just two tools, ThingLink EDU and Google Docs!

Two Flexible Tools

Keep it simple with just two tools. ThingLink and Google Docs both start as blank pages. Both tools are equipped with amazing features and capabilities to support endless possibilities. Combine the tools to design powerful learning experiences that maximize learning.  Here is a an example of a simple unit built with these two tools.

Simple Sample Unit – The Rainforest

I created this resource for driving a student centered guided learning experience  using ThingLink EDU and Google Docs. Explore this interactive image for an overview of how I an added a seamless layer of Google Docs to collect information and guide the learning.

  • Essential Questions – Document
  • Introduction – ThingLink for Video
  • Explore – ThingLink EDU
  • Exit Ticket – Google Form
  • Step-by-Step Guided Learning – Slides
  • In Box to Collect Links to Images – Form

 

Explore Simple Rainforest Unit

Quick Trick – Create an Interactive Collage

Use the built in tools in Google Slides to

  1. Find and collect images with the research tool.
  2. Annotate sources.
  3. Crop with Mask to create shapes.
  4. Create a complete collage.
  5. Take a snapshot and Save as .jpg

Use ThingLink edu to add layers of content to an image.

  1. Upload image to ThingLink _EDU
  2. Add rich media tags to present information
    1. Audio
    2. Video
    3. Images on images
    4. Google Docs

Final Thoughts

ThingLink EDU and Google Docs present powerful possibilities for redefining learning. If you are looking for more ways to become inspired, please joing members of the ThingLink EDU community as we share great uses through an Interactive Image Slam on September 14th or 16th.

Learn More and Sign Up

 

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We are pleased to announce a series of September webinars designed to help educators discover the power of using ThingLink EDU for teaching and learning. We hope you will join us for one or more of these free, online learning opportunities.

Descriptions

Build Your ThingLink Classroom: Tips & Tricks for Teachers

Are you making the most of the management features available in the ThingLink Classroom?

ThingLink EDU is packed full of features to help teachers efficiently manage a safe and secure online learning environment powered by ThingLink interactive images. This webinar is designed to provide busy teachers with an overview of the newest features and offer tips and tricks for seamlessly integrating ThingLink EDU into your own classroom. Spend less time figuring things out on your own and more time leveraging the power of ThingLink as a tool for teaching and learning.

In this webinar we explore ways to

  • Create student accounts and invite them to join multiple teachers’ classrooms.
  • Create and manage students groups for collaborative groupwork.
  • Use channels to create collections of images for sharing and publishing.
  • Create and use shared custom icons for a variety of useful purposes.
  • Take advantage of the full circle of flexible options across platforms and devices to support teaching and learning with ThingLink.

Of course, we will feature inspiring examples throughout the webinar and we will save plenty of time for questions from the audience. Sign up for Build Your ThingLink Classroom: Tips & Tricks for Teachers today!

Sign up:

September 9th at 8:00 PM EST

September 11th at 7:00 PM EDT

ThingLink Interactive Image Slam

ThingLink EDU is a powerful digital learning platform that provides users with the ability to turn any image or video into a multimedia-rich interactive learning tool. Members of our rapidly growing ThingLink Community of Educators have discovered ways to use the tools for a variety of innovative uses across all content areas and grade levels. To share inspiring examples, we are pleased to introduce a unique type of webinar, known as the ThingLink Interactive Image Slam.

ThingLink Interactive Images Slams provide real educators in our community with an opportunity to share, highlight and discuss great ThingLink interactive images or video they have created and used with students of all ages. Discover the endless creative possibilities for enriching students’ enthusiasm for learning like never before through a unique webinar highlighting the work of our users and learn about how you can have a chance to grab the spotlight by signing up for a ThingLink Interactive Image Slam today.

Sign up:

September 16th at 8:00 PM EDT

September 18th at 7:00 PM EDT

 

ThingLink for Powerful Professional Development

Are you looking for a way to increase audience engagement, maximize instructional time and improve the professional development sessions you facilitate?

ThingLink is an interactive image and video annotation tool that allows users to pack a lot of content into one small space, making it an excellent choice for use as an engaging resource to power professional development. The flexibility of ThingLink makes it appealing to a wide range of audience participants, since it can be used across content areas, grade levels and devices. Rich-media tag embedding combined with the ability to link to any content on the web allows presenters to design and facilitate interactive PD to meet the goals of any session.

Highlights of this webinar include

  • An brief overview of the SAMR model to help work with participants who are at different stages of tech integration.
  • Use of pre and post assessment tools to fine tune and evaluate instruction.
  • Use of ThingLink Interactive Video for self-paced learning, reteaching and challenge.
  • Use of rich-media tags and 3rd party web tools to promote active engagement throughout your session.
  • Examples of interactive images used to successfully facilitate PD.

Sign up:

September 23rd at 8:00 PM EDT

 

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Are you looking for a user friendly and flexible tool to help you easily create engaging multimedia rich content to redefine teaching and learning? Are you interested in using technology to meet the personal learning needs of the students in your classroom? We invite you to attend our free webinar and explore the powerful possibilities that exist with ThingLink EDU. 

ThingLink EDU is a digital tool that provides users with the ability to turn any image or video into a multimedia rich interactive learning tool. Start with an image or start with a video. Annotate it with audio, video, images and links to any content on the Internet with the click of a button. 

Please join us for a free webinar on August 18th at 4:00PM CST as we explore inspiring examples and easy-to-follow instructions to help you transform teaching and redefine learning with ThingLink. 

Sign up 




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By Stacey Decker

It’s a premise familiar to online journalists: There’s a new tool for creating interactives. It’s sleek and it has the potential to increase reader engagement. Fast forward 6 months and you can’t even remember your login information to get on the site. (Let’s hope you know your mother’s maiden name.)

Online tools are a lot like real tools that way—some just collect dust. In modern newsrooms, where journalists are strapped for time, new forms of storytelling need to have a high impact, but a low barrier to entry. ThingLink has those elements. For us at Education Week, it’s a useful resource … and one that we actually use.

Why We Use Thinglink

There are a few complex features of ThingLink that are especially impressive. The interface is extremely user-friendly. Thinglink is integrated with other platforms we already use, like YouTube and Soundcloud. Thinglink provides publishers with a lot of useful analytics about images and viewer behavior, including hovers and clicks. And the site has an engaged community.

But the real beauty of Thinglink is its simplicity. It’s easy to conceptualize a story that works in this format. There aren’t any prerequisites to begin using the tool, other than a good idea. And that good idea gives back. Embed a Thinglink on your site and you can take create an immersive experience on any page.

How We Use Thinglink

At Education Week, we have two main uses for Thinglink:

1. Narrative Storytelling

When using Thinglink to tell a story, we let our photography take the lead. The context, links, and additional material we layer on ties everything together. In this example (now with more than 4,000 views), images, text, and audio, converge to reveal the complexities of arming educators:

2. Infographics and Resource Multimedia Thinglink can be helpful to journalists looking for interesting ways to present data, information, and tips and tricks. In our most popular Thinglink to date (with almost 20,000 views), we used the tool to show our audience of educators how to teach students to vet research materials:

Three Tips for Journalists

If I’ve convinced you to try Thinglink, here’s some helpful advice:

1. Look at what other publishers are doing.

Plenty of newspapers—international, national, and local—are using Thinglink to show off their front pages, section fronts, and $126 billion dollar magazine covers. Others have gotten more inventive. The Washington Post partnered with Thinglink on their coverage of the 2013 White House Correspondents’ Dinner. The Guardian has used Thinglink to layer videos and archival material on top of infographics. Mashable’s used it to make a holiday gift guide. And Discovery Communications has worked with Thinglink to use the tool as a way to deliver advertising.

2. Look at what everybody else is doing.

Commercial outfits like Home Depot, State Farm, and Groupon are using Thinglink to share tips and promote products and services. Thinglink’s unaffiliated users are arguably the most innovative, using the medium to enhance posters, illustrations, maps, and historical photos.

3. Experiment and Edit.

The best way to get acquainted with Thinglink is to upload an image and start tagging. (If you want to do this in private, change your image visibility to “unlisted” until you’ve got your image the way you want it.) Look for additional media (videos, audio, photos, tweets, etc.) to make your images richer. But don’t overdo it; tags shouldn’t overwhelm your image. In the same vein, keep tag descriptions short. And think about the order of your tags. In the end, your Thinglink should service your reader.

Bonus Tip: Get the browser plugin. (It’s a huge time saver.)

I look forward to seeing more of the creative and complex ways newsrooms and publishers put this tool to work for them.


education-week-logo

Stacey Decker is Online News Editor at Education Week (www.edweek.org), America’s source for news and opinion on K-12 education issues.

 

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Enjoy some Halloween ThingLinks that caught our eyes. A Happy Halloween to all!

 

 

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Screen Shot 2013-10-14 at 11.30.52 AMThe Interactive Image Revolution – How Top Brands are Powering Engagement,” a report presented today at the Pivot Conference, features the first independent analysis of ThingLink interactive image performance and its use by major publishers and brands.

To obtain a specific sense of ThingLink’s impact on ad fundamentals, The Pivot Conference and ThingLink worked together during the summer of 2013 to study ThingLink programs of companies across four core categories: Editorial Web, Editorial Social, Brand Web and Brand Social. In each case, actual, live ThingLink implementations were examined. In each category, 15 ThingLink enabled images were studied.

The results of the study show a dramatic impact for ThingLink images as response generators. At a time when banner ad click rates subsist between .01% and .04%, depending on source, ThingLink delivered an average click rate of between 5.7% and 16%. Not only was the overall response rate breathtakingly high, the study indicated some clear reasons why.

According to Mike Edelhart, CEO of Pivot, who authored the report, “One of the reasons ThingLink’s information-embedding approach has power is because it transforms an image from a single object, clickable or not, into a cornucopia of information choices. This produces an engagement intensification that neither standard images nor content approaches can deliver.”

ThingLink content elements generated “hover” engagement at up to nearly 4X the level of views. This means a ThingLink image can generate four interactions from a single view. At the lowest level, ThingLink produced a 50% secondary engagement per view. Any one of these intensified interactions can be the trigger for a click.

“In short, the information-enabled image appears to be a more powerful tool for generating clicks than any other we have seen before,” said Edelhart.

The ThingLink study shows clearly that the more information options in an image – shown on the table as number of Tags – the higher the engagement intensification. That doesn’t necessarily lead directly to higher click rates, but it certainly increases the potential for maximization.

Another view of ThingLink’s power can be seen by diving into the performance of Groupon’s program in the summer of 2013. Across six different products, ThingLink produced a remarkable click rate of 16% and an intensification of 96%, which means that nearly all of those who viewed the images saw the additional content that ThingLink delivered. In essence, that is a fundamental doubling of engagement; each user sees both the image itself and at least one additional piece of content on each view. We feel it is this essential intensification that drives ThingLink’s high response rates.

In addition to studying how others use ThingLink, Pivot itself used the platform to enhance promotion and information delivery for the Conference.

“We addressed the challenge of bringing a star-studded preview video about Pivot to our home page without pushing other key content below the fold by embedded the video thumbnail into our home page header with ThingLink,” noted Edelhart.  “There was a 41% increase in new traffic to Pivot’s external marketing programs after creating a Thinglink button to promote the program within Pivot’s web header.”

Pivot Conference also used ThingLink to transform the images of Pivot’s speakers into information launch pads.  “With ThingLink we were able to bring web pages, social connections, bios, videos and other speaker background right into the pictures,” added Edelhart.  There was an increase in the average time on the speaker section of Pivot’s website from 3:07 to 4:04. Conference organizers also received a gush of pleasure from Pivot’s generally hard to please speakers to this implementation, as many asked to include additional content within their pictures on the site.

For more information visit ThingLink.com. For a copy of the report visit the Pivot Conference.

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ThingLink and Discovery Communications, the world’s #1 nonfiction media, have announced a partnership for deploying ThingLink-powered interactive images and display ads across the digital destinations for Discovery Channel, TLC, Animal Planet, Science and other networks in their portfolio.

To enhance the partnership, Discovery, ThingLink, and Flite announced an integration of ThingLink inside Flite’s Ad Studio. Flite publishers like Discovery, as well as advertisers, agencies and brands with ThingLink premium accounts, can now deploy ThingLink-powered rich media display ads for desktop and mobile through Flite’s ad server platform.

images

Discovery is driving digital advertising innovation by utilizing Thinglink’s interactive tagging capabilities to enhance their content and to deliver value for partners. By using custom-designed images, Discovery can tell more compelling creative stories that offer clients and brands the chance to integrate more seamlessly around sponsorship initiatives or custom-produced programs.

Key to their strategy is organically driving views and engagement beyond traditional advertising techniques through SEO and increased fan engagement that extends to social connections.  Discovery will strategically target these new rich media ads to compliment their image-based editorial content thereby creating a cohesive user experience that feels very integrated and blurs the line between content and traditional ad spaces.

ThingLink’s Premium platform enables publishers to serve 3rd party content over images. Publishers can use custom graphical icons on ThingLink images and build proprietary in-image applications for shopping, content marketing, and social connection. ThingLink’s real-time metrics allow for invaluable data collection with click-through-rates that continually outperform standards. ThingLink images are also viewable across social channels and web pages and shareable to social channels like Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr.  Four of the top ten newspaper publishers and ten of the top fifty global brands use ThingLink for creating and sharing interactive images.  ThingLink publisher partners also include CBS Interactive and New York Magazine.

Flite empowers their publisher and brand clients to easily publish brand assets and messaging directly into their paid media. Flite has an expanding library of third party ad components, which allow clients to easily bring in content from providers such as Twitter, Facebook, Youtube, and more. With the added integration of ThingLink, Flite continues to offer interactive functionality within display advertising for both clients and partners.

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