Tag Archives: design

Image of the Week: Organize Projects using ThingLink

ThingLink’s variety of media tags allow students to organize projects. Our image of the week comes to us courtesy of Cassie Nix. Her students organized their Bloxels projects by explaining the parts of a story, such as character, plot, setting, etc. The ThingLink here is used to share how they designed and created their games.

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Take the Arts & Design Creative Challenge

Are you ready for another STEAM related Creative Challenge? In an ongoing effort to curate content related to the disciplines involved in STEAM, we are pleased to announce the Arts & Design Creative Challenge. This Creative Challenge helps us demonstrate amazing ways to use ThingLink by encouraging members of our EDU community to create, share and curate with ThingLink. As a bonus, the winner of this Creative Challenge will receive 3 ThingLink EDU Premium accounts for teachers at your school!

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GUEST POST: Thinglink: A Tool for Journalists That Journalists Should Actually Use

By Stacey Decker

It’s a premise familiar to online journalists: There’s a new tool for creating interactives. It’s sleek and it has the potential to increase reader engagement. Fast forward 6 months and you can’t even remember your login information to get on the site. (Let’s hope you know your mother’s maiden name.)

Online tools are a lot like real tools that way—some just collect dust. In modern newsrooms, where journalists are strapped for time, new forms of storytelling need to have a high impact, but a low barrier to entry. ThingLink has those elements. For us at Education Week, it’s a useful resource … and one that we actually use.

Why We Use Thinglink

There are a few complex features of ThingLink that are especially impressive. The interface is extremely user-friendly. Thinglink is integrated with other platforms we already use, like YouTube and Soundcloud. Thinglink provides publishers with a lot of useful analytics about images and viewer behavior, including hovers and clicks. And the site has an engaged community.

But the real beauty of Thinglink is its simplicity. It’s easy to conceptualize a story that works in this format. There aren’t any prerequisites to begin using the tool, other than a good idea. And that good idea gives back. Embed a Thinglink on your site and you can take create an immersive experience on any page.

How We Use Thinglink

At Education Week, we have two main uses for Thinglink:

1. Narrative Storytelling

When using Thinglink to tell a story, we let our photography take the lead. The context, links, and additional material we layer on ties everything together. In this example (now with more than 4,000 views), images, text, and audio, converge to reveal the complexities of arming educators:

2. Infographics and Resource Multimedia Thinglink can be helpful to journalists looking for interesting ways to present data, information, and tips and tricks. In our most popular Thinglink to date (with almost 20,000 views), we used the tool to show our audience of educators how to teach students to vet research materials:

Three Tips for Journalists

If I’ve convinced you to try Thinglink, here’s some helpful advice:

1. Look at what other publishers are doing.

Plenty of newspapers—international, national, and local—are using Thinglink to show off their front pages, section fronts, and $126 billion dollar magazine covers. Others have gotten more inventive. The Washington Post partnered with Thinglink on their coverage of the 2013 White House Correspondents’ Dinner. The Guardian has used Thinglink to layer videos and archival material on top of infographics. Mashable’s used it to make a holiday gift guide. And Discovery Communications has worked with Thinglink to use the tool as a way to deliver advertising.

2. Look at what everybody else is doing.

Commercial outfits like Home Depot, State Farm, and Groupon are using Thinglink to share tips and promote products and services. Thinglink’s unaffiliated users are arguably the most innovative, using the medium to enhance posters, illustrations, maps, and historical photos.

3. Experiment and Edit.

The best way to get acquainted with Thinglink is to upload an image and start tagging. (If you want to do this in private, change your image visibility to “unlisted” until you’ve got your image the way you want it.) Look for additional media (videos, audio, photos, tweets, etc.) to make your images richer. But don’t overdo it; tags shouldn’t overwhelm your image. In the same vein, keep tag descriptions short. And think about the order of your tags. In the end, your Thinglink should service your reader.

Bonus Tip: Get the browser plugin. (It’s a huge time saver.)

I look forward to seeing more of the creative and complex ways newsrooms and publishers put this tool to work for them.


education-week-logo

Stacey Decker is Online News Editor at Education Week (www.edweek.org), America’s source for news and opinion on K-12 education issues.

 

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iReporting from Egypt and around your world – with ThingLink

Make ThingLink your solution for iReporting on the world around you. Whether you’re a journalist, a cause-related advocate or a student, images are an ideal way to tell a deeper, more engaging story about your world with video players, text, Twitter links, and more embedded right in your images. And you can do it with ThingLink’s web app and mobile app.

@EduardCousin and @HoqookEnglish publish daily updates in Twitter and Facebook on the situation in Egypt using ThingLink to host status links and related media coverage.

HoqookEnglish5:45am via Facebook
The news from #Egypt brought by Hoqook: Deadly clashes erupted in cities at the Suez Canal, in the Delta and in… fb.me/20riE2INm

Blogger @ryanburdick shares yummy restaurant reviews on ThingLink images.

The Press-Enterprise newspaper reported on the Perseid meteor shower with an annotated graphic that added a deeper dimension to a story that appeared in their online edition.

Adam Broitman reported on the Citibike program in NYC with a ThingLink image.

And using ThingLink’s mobile app, I filed my own report on a band performing in the Lexington Avenue/53rd Street Subway station in New York City.

Create iReporting images with ThingLink’s web and mobile app and share stories on the world around you.

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ThingLink Updates Editor with Search and Preview

Today we are happy to share a major improvement to the image editor on our web platform at ThingLink.com.Screen Shot 2013-05-29 at 1.34.17 PM

You can now use our search functionality to find wonderful content for your images.

Your search will query content at Etsy, SoundCloud, Amazon, ThingLink pictures, YouTube and Vimeo.

Run your search, click on an item you want to feature in your image, save tag, and it’s added to your image with a preview so you can see what it looks like when hovered.

As always you can add a tag description of up to 1500 characters and change the icon to a standard one for free user accounts or a custom one for premium user accounts.

If you want your company’s products featured in ThingLink Search, please contact our business development team.

 

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ThingLink Mobile: Tips for Adding Live Videos to Images

ThingLink Mobile is the ideal iOS App for creating interactive images with embedded video players, text links and @Twitter IDs. This post focuses on adding live videos to images.

Take a picture with your iPhone using ThingLink Mobile (or use an existing photo). I saw the band Chicago at Westbury Music Fair this weekend and used ThingLink to capture videos of my favorite songs on images shot at the show.

 Here’s how you can take family and concert photos and capture moments around you daily by adding videos into your images.

1 Open ThingLink Mobile on your iPhone.

2 Take a new photo or use any image from your gallery.

3 Touch the image and two options appear:

photo

 

      Add Text – touch and add any text including #hashtags and @Twitter handles.

   Add Video – touch and you’ll see three video options

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now lets add a video.

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  Take a Video – shoot your own 30 second videos.

  Choose from Gallery – add videos you’ve already shot with iPhone.

   Add from YouTube – touch and open up a search on YouTube – add your favorite videos from YouTube.

 

 

 

 

 

TIPS for Adding Live Video – to avoid seeing upside down or sideways videos inside the image:

Shooting video with the REAR camera, hold the iPhone with the HOME button to your right.

Shooting video with the FRONT camera, hold the iPhone with the HOME button to your left.

IMPORTANT: NEVER shoot videos with the camera held vertically.

photo 3If you see an iPhone image overlay while getting set to shoot a video, it means you’re holding the camera incorrectly.

The iPhone image overlay is an error message.  Flip the camera until that overlay disappears. When the image disappears, you’re ready to shoot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The image below is what you see if you shoot video and have the HOME button on the wrong side.  The image overlay is an error message. Flip the camera until that overlay disappears.

photo 4

 

Here is what you should see when you’re holding the camera properly.  Now, you’re ready to shoot.

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Good luck shooting ThingLink Mobile videos.  Questions? Write to support@thinglink.com.

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ThingLink Launches ThingLink Mobile –Interactive Image Creation for iPhone and iPad

TL mobile logoTake picture + add videos + add text + share

ThingLink today launched its free mobile app, ThingLink Mobile, available for download via the iTunes store, ThingLink Mobile is the first iOS app to let users create interactive images with video players and text instantly embeddable into pictures taken with their camera. The free app for the iPhone and iPad creates interactive images that are shareable to Twitter and Facebook, and are designed to live within the platforms themselves.

 ThingLink’s web-based app has been used by major publishers and advertisers to increase engagement with their content. The Washington Post was the first news outlet to use a pre-release version of the ThingLink Mobile app, creating interactive images of the White House Correspondents’ Dinner.

tl_iPad_screen_A “ThingLink Mobile has one goal: to give more meaning to your camera images, allowing them to instantly come alive in new ways,” said CEO and founder of ThingLink, Ulla Engeström. “As a storytelling tool, ThingLink Mobile unleashes creative ways to capture deeper moments. It also brings the ability to microblog within images to anyone with a smartphone.”

Even in the beta version, users have found interesting uses for the app including: travel images with details of exotic meals, images of newlyweds with the first dance from the wedding embedded into an image, birthdays that come to life with video, and second hand sellers using videos and notes to illustrate the details of the items they’re retailing.

When users download ThingLink Mobile and sign up, they have a free channel for their images at ThingLink.com. Within ThingLink, users can add additional apps (tags) to their images with content from: SoundCloud, Spotify, Google Maps, Amazon, eBay, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and other sites. Those images are instantly shareable to Tumblr, Pinterest, Google!+, Facebook, Twitter, Edmodo and email.

ThingLink’s web-based platform has long been popular among advertisers and publishers for its ability to engage readers and encourage participation. ThingLink Mobile will bring that experience and ability to create compelling personal content to the individual user. People are invited to download the app to make their own interactive images.

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Great meeting you at SxSW2013!

We had a great time at SxSW meeting so many ThingLink users among musicians, film makers, brands and agencies.

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Collaborative editing for user-generated images: 7DayPic enables ThingLink image tagging

This week’s feature release enables collaborative editing of tagged images for entire websites. The idea for this feature came from Julio Castillo who runs an image sharing website 7DayPic. As the name indicates, the service lets you host and share images for 7 days. One day Julio emailed us and asked: “I have an image-hosting service, and would like to try enabling ThingLink tagging for my users. Is that possible?”

We thought this was a great idea, and a first step towards enabling image tagging for community sites. In this release the feature appears in its simplest form: upload an image, tag it with ThingLink’s in-image tags and share it with the world.

Examples of use cases:

1) party/event images
Share photos of your party and invite your friends to tag them. Who is in the picture? What is happening? Who is wearing what? Don’t worry, these image will not be around forever!

2) short-term campaigns
Creating a 7-day campaign site has never been this easy! Just upload your image to 7DayPic, tag it and share it. This can be used for a conference, product launch or a music event.

3) education
A biology home assignment for 5th grade students: identify plants using digital image archives.

Try it out for yourself by using one of the many apps that 7DayPic features. Be creative, crazy and wild. Remember that the images only last seven days.

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Thinglink Adds In-Image Links to Artek Open Archives

Thinglink is collaborating with The Scandinavian design house Artek to add interactive, in-image links to historical images in the Artek Open Archives. The project is aimed at building Artek’s online community and driving user engagement.

Artek has an exceptionally rich image database depicting interiors, exhibitions, installations, and diverse projects dating from 1935 to now. Artek has now made these images accessible to everybody in the Artek Open Archives, an image database showcasing past and present Artek interiors from around the world.

“Our collaboration with Artek is an example of transforming a rich, historical image archives into a fun interactive viewing experience with social features that are also benefit the business,” said Thinglink CEO Ulla-Maaria Engeström.

Thinglink image interaction technology in the Artek Open Archives will enable these features:

In-image tags as points of navigation
Images will feature interactive Thinglink in-image tags – interactive hotspots that reveal contextual information about the venue and time period as well as more detailed product information.

Easy sharing
Thinglink will make images shareable in two ways: anyone can share a favorite image via Twitter and Facebook, and bloggers can freely copy an image (in the interactive format with tags) and use it in a blog post.

Image statistics
Thinglink will provide real-time statistics on user interaction with images.

The Artek Open Archives will be launched at the Stockholm Furniture Fair on Tuesday February 8th at the Artek display A10:30. Visit Artek Open Archives online to see it for yourself.

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