Tag Archives: embed

Using ThingLink and Sutori to App Smash Your Lesson

The following is a post written by Laura Moore and published on the Sutori Blog on November 14, 2017. Laura is a K-12 Technology Integrator for North East Independent School District in San Antonio, Texas. Laura is a longtime ThingLink Certified Educator who continues to amaze us with her talents and innovative ideas for embracing technology for learning. Explore Laura's work on ThingLink and Sutori. Connect with her on Twitter at @LearnMooreStuff and follow her amazing blog, Learn Moore Stuff.

Wouldn’t it be cool if you could design a lesson any way you wanted without platform limitations?

The term App Smash was coined by Greg Kulowiec (@gregkulowiec), who shares much of his work and thinking on his website, The History 2.0 Classroom. After working with iPads for some time, he quickly realized the following,

“Most processes couldn’t be completed with just one app. While many apps slightly overlap in terms of functionality, there tends to be a few black holes in each app that require the use of another app to complete the process.”

The same can be said for web-based tools such as G Suite. In a perfect world, I would have the ability to embed content within a Google Doc. There are a few hacks you can use to embed a YouTube video, but it’s really not the same. When platforms allow you to work in conjunction with other platforms, then your “what if?” can become a reality.

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GUEST POST: Thinglink: A Tool for Journalists That Journalists Should Actually Use

By Stacey Decker

It’s a premise familiar to online journalists: There’s a new tool for creating interactives. It’s sleek and it has the potential to increase reader engagement. Fast forward 6 months and you can’t even remember your login information to get on the site. (Let’s hope you know your mother’s maiden name.)

Online tools are a lot like real tools that way—some just collect dust. In modern newsrooms, where journalists are strapped for time, new forms of storytelling need to have a high impact, but a low barrier to entry. ThingLink has those elements. For us at Education Week, it’s a useful resource … and one that we actually use.

Why We Use Thinglink

There are a few complex features of ThingLink that are especially impressive. The interface is extremely user-friendly. Thinglink is integrated with other platforms we already use, like YouTube and Soundcloud. Thinglink provides publishers with a lot of useful analytics about images and viewer behavior, including hovers and clicks. And the site has an engaged community.

But the real beauty of Thinglink is its simplicity. It’s easy to conceptualize a story that works in this format. There aren’t any prerequisites to begin using the tool, other than a good idea. And that good idea gives back. Embed a Thinglink on your site and you can take create an immersive experience on any page.

How We Use Thinglink

At Education Week, we have two main uses for Thinglink:

1. Narrative Storytelling

When using Thinglink to tell a story, we let our photography take the lead. The context, links, and additional material we layer on ties everything together. In this example (now with more than 4,000 views), images, text, and audio, converge to reveal the complexities of arming educators:

2. Infographics and Resource Multimedia Thinglink can be helpful to journalists looking for interesting ways to present data, information, and tips and tricks. In our most popular Thinglink to date (with almost 20,000 views), we used the tool to show our audience of educators how to teach students to vet research materials:

Three Tips for Journalists

If I’ve convinced you to try Thinglink, here’s some helpful advice:

1. Look at what other publishers are doing.

Plenty of newspapers—international, national, and local—are using Thinglink to show off their front pages, section fronts, and $126 billion dollar magazine covers. Others have gotten more inventive. The Washington Post partnered with Thinglink on their coverage of the 2013 White House Correspondents’ Dinner. The Guardian has used Thinglink to layer videos and archival material on top of infographics. Mashable’s used it to make a holiday gift guide. And Discovery Communications has worked with Thinglink to use the tool as a way to deliver advertising.

2. Look at what everybody else is doing.

Commercial outfits like Home Depot, State Farm, and Groupon are using Thinglink to share tips and promote products and services. Thinglink’s unaffiliated users are arguably the most innovative, using the medium to enhance posters, illustrations, maps, and historical photos.

3. Experiment and Edit.

The best way to get acquainted with Thinglink is to upload an image and start tagging. (If you want to do this in private, change your image visibility to “unlisted” until you’ve got your image the way you want it.) Look for additional media (videos, audio, photos, tweets, etc.) to make your images richer. But don’t overdo it; tags shouldn’t overwhelm your image. In the same vein, keep tag descriptions short. And think about the order of your tags. In the end, your Thinglink should service your reader.

Bonus Tip: Get the browser plugin. (It’s a huge time saver.)

I look forward to seeing more of the creative and complex ways newsrooms and publishers put this tool to work for them.


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Stacey Decker is Online News Editor at Education Week (www.edweek.org), America’s source for news and opinion on K-12 education issues.

 

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iReporting from Egypt and around your world – with ThingLink

Make ThingLink your solution for iReporting on the world around you. Whether you’re a journalist, a cause-related advocate or a student, images are an ideal way to tell a deeper, more engaging story about your world with video players, text, Twitter links, and more embedded right in your images. And you can do it with ThingLink’s web app and mobile app.

@EduardCousin and @HoqookEnglish publish daily updates in Twitter and Facebook on the situation in Egypt using ThingLink to host status links and related media coverage.

HoqookEnglish5:45am via Facebook
The news from #Egypt brought by Hoqook: Deadly clashes erupted in cities at the Suez Canal, in the Delta and in… fb.me/20riE2INm

Blogger @ryanburdick shares yummy restaurant reviews on ThingLink images.

The Press-Enterprise newspaper reported on the Perseid meteor shower with an annotated graphic that added a deeper dimension to a story that appeared in their online edition.

Adam Broitman reported on the Citibike program in NYC with a ThingLink image.

And using ThingLink’s mobile app, I filed my own report on a band performing in the Lexington Avenue/53rd Street Subway station in New York City.

Create iReporting images with ThingLink’s web and mobile app and share stories on the world around you.

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Introducing interactive lessons on Edmodo

ThingLink allows you to create interactive images enriched with video, sounds, music and more. Now you can also share them on Edmodo to teach, inspire and entertain students as well as teachers. With only a few clicks, you can embed live interactive images on Edmodo for everyone to engage with and learn from. Here are our step by step instructions and you can also watch the video or click through the slide set below.

Here goes:

1. Sign up for ThingLink. It only takes a minute and you can do it with your Facebook, Twitter or email account.

2. Make an interactive image of your own or pick one from the thousands of images that have already been created with ThingLink by using our search function.

3. Click on Share image in the top left corner of any image and select Edmodo. You will see an embed script. Click on “Copy to clipboard”.

    

4. Log in to your Edmodo account. Create a new post and add a link to it.

5. Paste in the iframe code to the field that says http://or<embed>

6. Give the attachment a title and click Attach

7. Fill in the empty fields and click Send

8. Your live interactive image will now show up in your posts and it can be opened and closed by clicking the attachment icon.

 

There are lots of interactive images on ThingLink that you can use for your lessons. Check out these resources:

Discover a treasure trove of innovative ideas and support for using interactive graphics for teaching and learning at the ThingLink Toolkit for Teachers.

 

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Our summer surprise: TED Talks video tags

The summer sun has given our developers an extra boost and we have a sunny surprise for our users and the organizers of the TED conferences. You can now create TED Rich Media Tags with Thinglink!

Just insert TED talk URLs straight into a tag’s link field and it will turn it into a video tag much in the same way as our previous YouTube and Vimeo video tags. We love the innovation and inspiration TED brings to the world and we want to make it easy for everyone to embed and share TED videos on their images.

Follow the following steps to create your own TED image tags and help spread the videos around the world:

1. Take any TED talk URL such as this one: http://www.ted.com/talks/rebecca_mackinnon_let_s_take_back_the_internet.html

2. Insert it into the tag’s link field:

3. Here is the result:

Remember that the TED tag is only one of many ThingLink Rich Media Tags and all of them are as easy to set up. Visit ThingLink now to set up your own account.

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Track how your your tagged images spread

We have a nice little update for you that many have been asking for. One of ThingLink’s core features is the possibility to embed tagged images anywhere on the web. Embeddable features have always been a useful addition to other services such as YouTube, Flickr and Soundcloud, enabling the dynamic spread of great content across blogs or other websites. ThingLink now enables you to track all of the places where your images have been embedded, allowing you to see who is using your images and where.

The feature is located on ThingLink’s dashboard above each of your images, but naturally if the image hasn’t been embedded elsewhere there is only one location (in the example below you would only see the URL http://lovegolf.tumblr.com). We believe that the updated embed feature opens up new perspectives for ThingLink’s users that want to either launch campaigns and track them in real time or just see how their images are spreading around the world.

Now if you haven’t tried the embed feature yourself, you can try it out by hovering the top left corner and selecting embed image. This gives you a snippet of code which anyone can embed on any site to make your tagged image appear. The best thing is that if you have links or tagged media in your image, the links and media still point to the place you specified regardless of where the image is embedded.

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