Tag Archives: learning

Back to School – Essential ThingLink Resources for Teachers and Librarians

It’s back to school and time to share essential ThingLink Resources for teachers and librarians. The resources below contain scores of inspiring ideas from the large community teachers and librarians using ThingLink.

ThingLink ToolKit for Teachers from Susan Oxnevad offers innovative ideas and support for using interactive graphics for teaching and learning. There’s a valuable section on Common Core aligned activities and ideas.

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 72+ Interesting Ways to use ThingLink in the Classroom curated by Donna Baumbach contains a treasure trove of ideas by teachers and librarians for using ThingLink.

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A comprehensive List.ly of ThingLink resources by Lisa Johnson makes it  easy to tap into dozens of blog posts by educators on how to use ThingLink.

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Please share  these resources with your local community of teachers and librarians. And be sure to follow Susan, Donna and Lisa on ThingLink and add your ideas to these resources.

If you’re new to ThingLink, sign up for an educator account today.

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Introducing interactive lessons on Edmodo

ThingLink allows you to create interactive images enriched with video, sounds, music and more. Now you can also share them on Edmodo to teach, inspire and entertain students as well as teachers. With only a few clicks, you can embed live interactive images on Edmodo for everyone to engage with and learn from. Here are our step by step instructions and you can also watch the video or click through the slide set below.

Here goes:

1. Sign up for ThingLink. It only takes a minute and you can do it with your Facebook, Twitter or email account.

2. Make an interactive image of your own or pick one from the thousands of images that have already been created with ThingLink by using our search function.

3. Click on Share image in the top left corner of any image and select Edmodo. You will see an embed script. Click on “Copy to clipboard”.

    

4. Log in to your Edmodo account. Create a new post and add a link to it.

5. Paste in the iframe code to the field that says http://or<embed>

6. Give the attachment a title and click Attach

7. Fill in the empty fields and click Send

8. Your live interactive image will now show up in your posts and it can be opened and closed by clicking the attachment icon.

 

There are lots of interactive images on ThingLink that you can use for your lessons. Check out these resources:

Discover a treasure trove of innovative ideas and support for using interactive graphics for teaching and learning at the ThingLink Toolkit for Teachers.

 

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Salil Wilson – My Journey to ThingLink

By Salil Wilson

On first hearing about ThingLink (a Finnish based tech start up) I have to confess I was less than enthusiastic. Admittedly it was not the best introduction, it was over a meal with no demonstration. Just a good friend leaning forward and eagerly telling me rich media image tagging was going to be the next big thing.

It was one of those awkward moments where you know the person will be disappointed if you don’t respond with equal to or greater than the level of enthusiasm at which the information is being conveyed.

My initial thoughts were “What is rich media tagging?” and, “Why would you want to tag photos anyway?” (If you haven’t guessed I’m one of the 5 remaining people on earth who aren’t active on Facebook.)

I didn’t hear anymore about ThingLink from this fellow for about 2 weeks – he was obviously not fooled by my feigned interest. But, as with all evangalists, he couldn’t resist and sent me a link to the image below.
 

I was fascinated by this apparently quite a famous photo of the original Microsoft staff and all the extra information it contained thanks to ThingLink. I clicked on every single link and got a small sense of how each one of these people went on to live their lives – a little like a school graduation book. The next step for me, as it is for all ThingLink adopters, was to make my first ThingLink(ed) image. So I made one about the World Harmony Run – an event I organize and love.

It was very simple and great of fun. I could easily combine elements that would normally be beyond my reach or take hours of fiddling with html and ThingLink did it in a cleaner more functional and engaging way. (OK I’m not a web developer but neither are 99% of us).

I have since gone on to make quite a few ThingLink (ed) images and info-graphics and am even consulting for ThingLink. You can find many of these images at ThingLink and Learn. Here’s one below I’m quite proud of.

 

 

I continue to be surprised at how remarkably well ThingLink works – many times it does things that exceed my expectations. Just check out how well this Ipad info-graphic meshes with the Itunes rich media tags – I didn’t see that coming.

ThingLink is an idea whose time has come. It brings together many engaging elements of the web, combining them in a way where the whole is so much greater than the sum of its parts.

ThingLink has made me understand what mashup really is – and it is done really elegantly, after all what would you expect from those Finns.

Salil Wilson is Executive Director of the World Harmony Run – a global torch relay dedicated to World Peace. When he’s not running around the world with a torch he consults for ThingLink.

Visit the ThingLink team at the American Association of School Librarians 15th National Conference and ExhibitionBooth #330 – on October 27-30 in Minneapolis, MN.

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ThingLink: Engaging Students in Learning and Discovery

“I became a teacher because I wanted to make a difference in the lives of young people. I wanted to empower them to have a voice through creating, collaborating, and connecting,” writes Shannon Miller, a librarian, teacher, and technology specialist in her blog, Van Meter Library Voice.

ThingLink turns images into a platform for rich media. Educators and students can take any photo and add video and audio clips that play inside the image. You can also add Wikipedia links, Flickr images, annotations, and include social touch points like Twitter and Facebook.

Images now become a platform for creating, collaborating and connecting, because ThingLink images are far more engaging than static jpgs with viewers clicking through to content as high as 50% of the time.

Lets take an example from one of the key moments, or maybe The Key Moment in American history; The Declaration of Independence. John Trumbull’s famous painting –pictured below– is often identified as a depiction of the signing of the Declaration, but it actually shows the drafting committee presenting its work to the Congress. However, it’s rich with taggable content, and a great example of how ThingLink can be used as a fun participant/community driven educational tool.

“Tools like ThingLink “have potential for increasing our own productivity, for enhancing our teaching, for organizing our information resources and/or for helping students learn,” says Donna Baumbach who publishes WebTools4u2Use, a popular wiki for school library media specialists.

A large quantity of historical imagery is available for educational use without charge. Using images in education is a great way to get students to interact and enhance peer-to-peer learning. Let us say students in groups of two or more each choose an image filled with taggable content, research the image and tag it accordingly during a set period of time. They can then give the image over to another group who can further explore the image and learn about what the previous group created in the image. In the process a great deal is gained; learning to do research, using technology, spurring team work and last but not least, digesting the educational content in the image at hand.

 

Teaching and learning through images

Returning to the image above; as you can see, the tags have been used to virtually demonstrate not only the people behind the Declaration, but also provide the viewer with other rich media content, demonstrating there is only the limit of creativity. Not only does ThingLink make your teaching more fun, it helps establish two-way communication inside classrooms. Everyone can be a teacher and a learner with ThingLink. It can drive students into a concise, creative group, and help spur rich ideas and new interest by the dozens.

To use ThingLink, educators have to simply connect their website or blog. Tumblr blogs work great with ThingLink and they are easy, free and fast to set up. ThingLink tagging tool is provided at no cost, with an embeddable code to make all or individual images taggable. The installation takes a few minutes and is done by following the easy install instructions. You can also close and open images for tagging, i.e. enable anyone or no-one else but you to tag your images.

 

ThingLink Freemium account enables these features:

1) On-site tag editor: ThingLink tag editor lets you define interactive hotspots inside an image — from a THING (an object, a person, or a place) to a LINK (a site with more information, a blog post, or anywhere you like). The editor works on your own enabled site as long as you are logged in to ThingLink.

2) Easy Sharing: ThingLink makes images shareable: anyone can share a favorite image via Twitter, Facebook and email, and embed them on websites and blogs with tags.

3) Image community: ThingLink provides real-time statistics on user interaction with images. We measure image and tag-specific views, hovers, and clicks. This helps you evaluate the successfulness of interacting with you participants, i.e. students.

Thinglink could be a good way to have students take group blogging to a new level. Students working on a group blog could upload images then work together to add more information to the blog post in the form of image tags,” suggests Richard Byrne in his popular blogFree Tech for Teachers.

 

Lets sum up why ThingLink is so great for education:

  • Free of charge for educators;
  • Easy and fun to use;
  • Involves two-way communication;
  • Spreads information through social networks;
  • Everyone can be a teacher and a learner;
  • Community- and participant-driven; and
  • Can be used for either an ongoing forum or one-time exchange.

ThingLinktag, explore, and learn.

How could you and your students benefit from using ThingLink in your educative work? Here is an evolving document with tips and interesting reflections from teachers using the tagging tool in their work. Thank you @AuntyTech for creating the document and engaging our community.

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