Tag Archives: multimedia

A Webinar to Share Tips & Tricks

Efficient Ways to Manage ThingLink EDU in the Classroom

ThingLink EDU is has many features to help teachers efficiently manage a safe and secure ThingLink powered online learning environment. Google Drive is an  efficient tool for organizing and managing  the workflow in a ThingLink powered classroom. Together these two tools are unbeatable for managing a multi media rich learning environment.

Collect, sort and view all student work in one place!

We’re hosting a free webinar designed to provide busy teachers with an overview of the features available in ThingLink and ways to put them to use. Discover how to use Google Docs to automate tasks within this digital learning environment. Learn to seamlessly integrate ThingLink EDU into your own classroom.

 

Explore This Interactive Image

Spend less time figuring things out on your own and more time leveraging the power of ThingLink as a tool for teaching and learning. Scroll over the image to sign up for Build Your ThingLink Classroom: Tips & Tricks for Teachers today!

 

Time Restrictions?

This webinar will be archived for registered participants who are unable to attend the live session due to time restrictions. Please register to receive resources and archived webinar via email.

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ThingLink Teacher Challenge: Flip It with ThingLink For Video

This is the 5th post in the ThingLink Teacher Challenge series. Participants can join the challenge at any time by  signing up.  After you sign up, you will receive an email invitation from ThingLink. View a list of all posts in this series at the bottom of each weekly challenge. Please visit our showcase page.

Please Tweet and share through social media with the hashtag #TLChallenge. Feel free to repost any of the challenges on your own blog and be sure to invite your friends and colleagues to participate.

Week 5:  Create a Flipped Lesson

Objective

In this activity you will

  1. Find or create a video for independent instruction.

  2. Add your video to ThingLink For Video
  3. Tag the video with resources to enhance your independent lesson and build in accountability.

  4. Share your video by submitting the link through the Submit Link Form

Overview

In this activity you will use the new ThingLink for Video tool to create a lesson that can be used independently, outside of class, to prepare students for work that will be completed in class.

Rationale

Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams are a couple of innovative teachers who have developed an approach to teaching and learning known as The Flipped Classroom, which supports the idea of teachers as learning coaches. 

At it’s most basic level, The Flipped Classroom approach means front loading the learning and assigning the  prep work as homework in order for students to come to class prepared to use it. This means the classroom  becomes a place for collaboration, critical thinking, creativity and communication where the teacher serves as a facilitator who interacts with students, assesses them, and spontaneously pulls together groups for reteaching and challenge. The Flipped Classroom is a place where students are actively engaged in applying the learning and it is noisy and unpredictable. Worksheets as homework become obsolete and students no longer sit in the classroom listening to lectures. Essentially, The Flipped Classroom is a place where “the teachable moment” comes alive. 

While it does take a considerable amount of effort and dedication to truly facilitate a Flipped Classroom environment, teachers can test the waters by utilizing mini lessons, known as Flip Packs, to maximize instructional time. ThingLink For Video is a tool that is well-suited for the task.

Example

In this example I started with my own screencast, created with Screencast-o-Matic, a free online screen recorder. You can create your own video like I did and upload it to YouTube, or you can certainly start with an existing video from YouTube. Work at a level that you are comfortable with, and remember to keep it simple and fun the first time.

 

How To Create an Interactive Video

Note: Early access to ThingLink for video must be requested.  Get Early Access.

 

Classroom Connections and Modifications

  1. Start with an existing YouTube video and add tags with your own resources to add focus to the instruction. Add an exit ticket for accountability.
  2. Use video to introduce a task task, such as Common Core Writing, and add tags with samples for students to explore.
  3. Videotape a student performing a task, such as singing, upload it to YouTube and use ThingLink For Video to add reflections, comments or suggestions to critique the performance.

 

Additional Help and Support

ThingLink Teacher Challenge at a Glance

Showcase of Examples from Participants

Explore this channel of examples and watch it grow!

Next Week’s Challenge

Extend the Walls of the Classroom with the ThingLink App.

Take the Week 6 Challenge:  ThingLink Unpluged

 

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Build Your ThingLink Classroom

ThingLink is working hard to pack teacher accounts full of useful features for building and managing the ThingLink Classroom. I am excited to be guest blogging here in February and March to demonstrate great ways to use the new features. Let’s start from the beginning by taking a look at how teachers can create a ThingLink Classroom and add students.

Create Your Own ThingLink Classroom

Good news! When teachers sign up for a ThingLink Teacher account, a classroom group is now automatically created. Just sign up and grab your own classroom to experience the benefits of collecting, organizing and viewing the work of your students in one place!

 

Create Student Accounts

ThingLink has streamlined the sign-up process by providing teachers with the power to create student accounts from a simple list of names. Just pop your list into the designated box in your ThingLink Teacher account and the system will generate a list of student logins. After the first login, students can change their passwords if they choose. This feature is sure to help students get up and running in a snap.

Explore this interactive image and be sure to watch the video to see how easy it is to create student accounts with your ThingLink Teacher account.

Launch Your ThingLink Classroom

After students have accounts within your ThingLink Classroom, it’s time to let them to try out the tool. My advice is to start with something simple for use as an exploratory activity. Let students create an interactive image with familiar content to allow them to experience the ease of use of the tool in a way that doesn’t strain their brain. After students get their feet wet, you will discover many possibilities for teaching and learning with ThingLink.

Final Thoughts

ThingLink has been my trusted tool for quite some time and  I am truly excited to watch it grow into an amazing tool for students and teachers. Stay tuned for more exciting new ThingLink Teacher features to help you build your ThingLink Classroom.

Learn More and Build Your PLN

Want to learn more about the ThingLink Classroom? Join us for the ThingLink Challenge This Summer.

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Six Ways to Use ThingLink Hashtags in education

ThingLink has just launched a new feature: hashtags. Hashtags are handy searchable smart phrases that will make it easier to search and follow interesting content on ThingLink. In this post Susan Oxnevad writes about how hashtags can be used to accomplish some important classroom tasks, and how they can provide teachers and students with a way to easily organize ThingLink content within a safe learning environment.

Use ThingLink Hashtags to Easily Organize Content

1. Create Classroom Hashtags
Create a classroom hashtag and use it to help students quickly search for interactive images created by their own group. Keep it simple and slightly unique, try something like #Oxnevad101.

2. Create School Hashtags
If you are lucky enough to have a few colleagues in your school to explorie ThingLink EDU with, consider creating a school hashtag, like #BeyeSchool, to connect and collaborate. Teach students to use multiple hashtags to organize their searchable content.

3. Create Content Specific Hashtags
Create content specific hashtags to collaborate with members of the ThingLink EDU community. If you want to extend your reach, use the hashtags in your classroom Tweets too.

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4. Use ThingLink Hashtags to Address Internet Safety

Use avatars and pen names to remind students about Internet safety every time they create an interactive image. Students can create and use their own custom avatar icon to identify and organize their images, They can pop hashtags into the image description. They can create and use their own avatar pen name hashtags to protect their identities when online while providing them with opportunities to express themselves through their own personal ThingLink identity.

5. Use ThingLink Hashtags to Teach Students to Search
With the Internet in our pockets, searching has become an extremely important and useful skill to teach our students. Using hashtags can help students understand how the Internet is organized while allowing them to participate in the organizational process. Students can use multiple hashtags on every interactive image they create, but start simple and grow your hashtag network through experience.

6. Use ThingLink Hashtags to Collaborate & Connect
Teachers can invent and use ThingLink hashtags to collaborate with others and expand your personal learning network. Use hashtags to search and find content to target current initiatives and best practices. Here are a few ideas:
– Bloom’s Higher Order Thinking Skills
– Levels of Difficulty
– Multimedia Type
– Common Core State Standards

Try ThingLink Hashtags today!

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