Tag Archives: photo

ThingLink Shares First Interactive Image Benchmarks in Pivot Conference Report

Screen Shot 2013-10-14 at 11.30.52 AMThe Interactive Image Revolution – How Top Brands are Powering Engagement,” a report presented today at the Pivot Conference, features the first independent analysis of ThingLink interactive image performance and its use by major publishers and brands.

To obtain a specific sense of ThingLink’s impact on ad fundamentals, The Pivot Conference and ThingLink worked together during the summer of 2013 to study ThingLink programs of companies across four core categories: Editorial Web, Editorial Social, Brand Web and Brand Social. In each case, actual, live ThingLink implementations were examined. In each category, 15 ThingLink enabled images were studied.

The results of the study show a dramatic impact for ThingLink images as response generators. At a time when banner ad click rates subsist between .01% and .04%, depending on source, ThingLink delivered an average click rate of between 5.7% and 16%. Not only was the overall response rate breathtakingly high, the study indicated some clear reasons why.

According to Mike Edelhart, CEO of Pivot, who authored the report, “One of the reasons ThingLink’s information-embedding approach has power is because it transforms an image from a single object, clickable or not, into a cornucopia of information choices. This produces an engagement intensification that neither standard images nor content approaches can deliver.”

ThingLink content elements generated “hover” engagement at up to nearly 4X the level of views. This means a ThingLink image can generate four interactions from a single view. At the lowest level, ThingLink produced a 50% secondary engagement per view. Any one of these intensified interactions can be the trigger for a click.

“In short, the information-enabled image appears to be a more powerful tool for generating clicks than any other we have seen before,” said Edelhart.

The ThingLink study shows clearly that the more information options in an image – shown on the table as number of Tags – the higher the engagement intensification. That doesn’t necessarily lead directly to higher click rates, but it certainly increases the potential for maximization.

Another view of ThingLink’s power can be seen by diving into the performance of Groupon’s program in the summer of 2013. Across six different products, ThingLink produced a remarkable click rate of 16% and an intensification of 96%, which means that nearly all of those who viewed the images saw the additional content that ThingLink delivered. In essence, that is a fundamental doubling of engagement; each user sees both the image itself and at least one additional piece of content on each view. We feel it is this essential intensification that drives ThingLink’s high response rates.

In addition to studying how others use ThingLink, Pivot itself used the platform to enhance promotion and information delivery for the Conference.

“We addressed the challenge of bringing a star-studded preview video about Pivot to our home page without pushing other key content below the fold by embedded the video thumbnail into our home page header with ThingLink,” noted Edelhart.  “There was a 41% increase in new traffic to Pivot’s external marketing programs after creating a Thinglink button to promote the program within Pivot’s web header.”

Pivot Conference also used ThingLink to transform the images of Pivot’s speakers into information launch pads.  “With ThingLink we were able to bring web pages, social connections, bios, videos and other speaker background right into the pictures,” added Edelhart.  There was an increase in the average time on the speaker section of Pivot’s website from 3:07 to 4:04. Conference organizers also received a gush of pleasure from Pivot’s generally hard to please speakers to this implementation, as many asked to include additional content within their pictures on the site.

For more information visit ThingLink.com. For a copy of the report visit the Pivot Conference.

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ThingLink and Washington Post partner for White House Correspondents Dinner

ThingLink partnered with The Washington Post for coverage of the 2013 White House Correspondents Dinner in Washington D.C.

Post reporters used a pre-release version of ThingLink Mobile to enhance their live coverage of the event. Images appeared in social channels and “The Grid”, The Post’s live experience platform.

Read more at Journalism.co.uk

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ThingLink images are now interactive on Twitter.com

We’ve created our very own Twitter card! You can now experience ThingLink images directly on your Twitter page! This means that every time you share a scene on ThingLink to Twitter, the interactive image will show up live in Twitter’s stream. Isn’t that cool! It allows you to show your highlighted party pics or display products directly to your Twitter followers.

But… how does it work? The image below explains it:

 

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Add Interactive Photos to your Bandzoogle Website with ThingLink

This is originally a guest post by ThingLink’s CMO Neil Vineberg for Bandzoogle.

Using photos as a design element in web design is a powerful way to connect with fans. Great fan connections start with compelling photos. Bandzoogle makes it easy to add your best images to your website and also supplies a wide assortment of stock images that make your Bandzoogle site look awesome.

By using ThingLink, Bandzoogle users can make those personal and stock photos interactive with audio and video players, social links and social sharing.

What is ThingLink?
ThingLink is a free app that turns any photo in a platform for content and sharing. By activating a ThingLink account alongside Bandzoogle, you can make your website photos interactive. Add music and video players. Sell merch and albums inside photos. Place any interactive photo as an app on your Facebook fan page. And fans viewing your interactive photos can share them across their social networks and embed them in blogs and tumblrs, extending the power of your Bandzoogle site through images that live across the Web.

Who is Using ThingLink?
ThingLink has been popular with labels and artists like Van Halen, Keane, Evanescence, Seether, Blink-182, Gorillaz. Hundreds and thousands of bands like JCQ from the UK and Conveyor from Paper Garden Records in Brooklyn, NY, also make images interactive with ThingLink.

Why Interactive? It’s all about Engagement
Fans like to discover stuff. If you’re building a fan base, Interactive images can help you engage fans in content discovery and position content (an audio player song sample) on an image right next points of sale (shopping tags for Amazon, eBay, iTunes, BestBuy and more).

Thanh Nguyen, digital marketer at Atlantic Records, who has promoted albums by Jason Mraz, Simple Plan, Christina Perri, and Bruno Mars, uses ThingLink to “aggregate and link back to all of the band’s social properties” and he suggests that promoters “customize the offering as much as possible…make sure the content is compelling.”

Nick Lippman, manager of Rob Thomas and Matchbox 20, sees ThingLink as a way of “promoting the different avenues an artist and a brand are trying to get out simultaneously, such as single, new video, new tour dates, fan club opportunities, contests and more – all in one place!”

Go Facebook Interactive
In addition to adding interactive images to a Bandzoogle website, ThingLink is a DIY editor for creating apps for Facebook pages. Now any interactive concert poster or CD cover with links can appear as a Tab (App) on your Facebook Fan Page. Here’s how.

Lynn Grossman, at Secret Road Music Services, used ThingLink on Facebook to preview tunes from Songbook, the new album by Ingrid Michaelson. “We came up with the idea of publishing an embeddable online songbook that would preview a song a day, offer downloadable lyrics to the song and have her talking about the meaning of each song leading up to the day of the release. The goal was for people to engage with the songbook daily for 2 weeks and to share this experience on their social media sites. Thinklink proved to be the perfect solution.” The click through rate on this campaign was >80%.

What Can You Add With an Interactive Photo

  • Showcase your videos, sound clips and social links inside a photo.
  • Add iTunes, Amazon or Topspin sales tags to an album cover image.
  • Add a Bandzoogle tag featuring your band’s URL so viewers can link back to your Bandzoogle webpage
  • Create a Tab on your Facebook fan page featuring your interactive image.

What Can you Do with your Image App on Facebook

  • Post a concert tour poster with interactive links
  • Publish a concert image with sound or video links
  • Turn a merch package image into a store with sales tags.

What Kinds of Tags can you use on your images?
Check this slideshare of ThingLink Rich Media Tags.

 

In addition to these awesome tags, you can add any URL and up to a 1500 character description to a tag and it will show up as a tag.

Get Started with ThingLink
Sign up for a free account at ThingLink.com. Bandzoogle users will receive a free year of ThingLink PLUS when you use coupon code “ILuvBandzoogle” during the signup for PLUS.

Setting up Bandzoogle and ThingLink
Now that you’re signed up on ThingLink, here’s how to make your Bandzoogle images interactive.

1. Locate your Thinglink account embed code.

2. Copy the embed code to clipboard.

3. Open your Bandzoogle site and go to Bandzoogle’s “Design & Options”.

4. Click “Footer Text” on left side menubar.

5. Paste the contents of the clipboard to the Footer Text box. If you already have some existing contents, just make sure that you don’t overwrite them, but put the code after the content.

6. Click Save.

While you are logged into Thinglink, log into Bandzoogle at the same time. You can edit your images at Bandzoogle as long as your Thinglink.com account is also open.

For questions about ThingLink, visit ThingLink’s support forum.

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Introducing Image Discovery and Unlist Images

We have an important message for all ThingLink users about two new features we hope you love.

Starting Monday 21 May, we’re introducing image discovery on ThingLink by making is easier to find other images by each user.

When your ThingLink image is seen, we’ll also feature thumbnails of your other images. It’s how we’re making image discovery a click away. We’re also introducing a way for you to unlist an image you want to keep in draft mode.

 

Unlisting your images on ThingLink.com

You find the “Make image unlisted” feature in the image editor of your tagged images.

Checking the box unlists the image and no one will see it on ThingLink.com except for you and anyone who has the link. The image will of course still be visible on any other site that you may have tagged the image on.

Please unlist any images that you do not want to display on ThingLink.com by 21 May.

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ThingLink Moves Into Euro Fashion with Pixboom Acquisition

ThingLink has today announced the acquisition of Pixboom, the leading interactive image tagging service for the Swedish fashion industry.

Pixboom, founded in 2008 by entrepreneurs Jonas Sujkerbuik and Daniel Aspers and based in Stockholm, enables interactive images on hundreds of Swedish fashion blogs.

ThingLink CEO Ulla Engeström said: “Sweden leads the way in fashion blogging, and we’re excited to merge our collective expertise to build innovative interactive image services for fashion brands in ways that engage consumers and communities.”

Pixboom CEO Jonas Suijkerbuijk said: “We’re thrilled to be part of ThingLink and look forward to providing Pixboom clients with full access to ThingLink’s rich array of media tags, including sound and video players, e-commerce and social tags, image embeds, and one-click image sharing to Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and email.”

Fashion blogger Lovisa Hansson added: “During the days I have been using ThingLink, my blog stats increased, and I personally think that the images now have a different function with these tags that I can add on them.”

Pixboom CEO Jonas Suijkerbuijk will join the ThingLink Advisory Board. ThingLink will also establish a community manager position for the fashion industry.

Since launching in 2010, ThingLink has innovated the interactive image category, enabling more than 20,000 publishers of interactive images, including leaders in music, publishing, entertainment, politics, e-Commerce and education.

For more information visit ThingLink.com.

 

 

ThingLink förvärvar Pixboom och tar steget in i Europas modevärld

ThingLink har i dag meddelat att de förvärvar Pixboom, den ledande interaktiva taggningstjänsten för den svenska modeindustrin.

Stockholmsbaserade Pixboom, som grundades år 2008 av entreprenörerna Jonas Sujkerbuik och Daniel Aspers har möjliggjort för hundratals bloggare att öka interaktiviteten på sina bilder på ett enkelt och snyggt sätt.

ThingLinks VD Ulla Engeström säger: “Sverige banar väg för modebloggningen, och vi är ivriga att sammanföra vår samlade expertis för att bygga innovativa interaktiva verktyg för modeindustrin i syfte att engagera nya konsumenter och grupper på nätet”.

Pixbooms VD Jonas Suijkerbuijk säger: “Vi är glada att vara en del av ThingLink och vi ser fram emot att förse alla Pixbooms användare med full tillgång till ThingLinks samling av medietaggar, inklusive audio- och videospelare, e-handel och sociala bildtaggar, bildinfogningar samt delning till Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr och epost med en klickning.”

Modebloggaren Lovisa Hansson tillade: “Under den tid jag använt ThingLink har min statistik på bloggen gått upp, och jag tycker personligen att bilderna nu har en annan funktion med de bildtaggar som jag kan sätta ovanpå dem.”

Pixbooms VD Jonas Suijkerbuijk ansluter sig till ThingLinks rådgivande panel. ThingLink anställer också en community manager för att assistera användare inom modesektorn.

Sedan lanseringen 2010 har ThingLink förändrat den interaktiva bilden, och möjliggjort taggning av bilder för fler än 20.000 utgivare, inklusive ledare inom musik, förlagsverksamhet, underhållning, politik, e-handel och utbildning.

För mer information besök Pixbooms sida på ThingLink.com.

 

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Brand new features: Import your images from Facebook and tag them with Instagram photos

The big news about Facebook buying Instagram for a cool billion dollars got us quickly working on two new updates: Importing images from Facebook and then tagging them with Instagram images. We’re happy to announce that both are now live. Check out the image below for a few shots of people hard at work at our office.

 

 

Importing images from Facebook

So how do you get started? If you’re a new user, you’ll need to sign up. You will be prompted to upload or import images from Facebook or Flickr. Choose Facebook and sign into your account.

First you’ll see all your albums listed so click on the one you want to select images from. In the album, select one or several images and click “Import selected images”. All images will be imported to ThingLink and you’ll be able to tag them. If you only selected one image, the tag editor will automatically open.

 

Tagging with Instagram

Yes, you’re now able to tag images with your and other people’s Instagram photos. Since Instagram offers limited image browsing on their web version of the service it’s better that you use Gramfeed, Statigram or Webstagram to find interesting photos in their network. Just log in and grab the URL of any Instagram image. The URL needs to look like this – http://instagr.am/p/JwvlfkFtOV/, starting with http://instagr.am and followed by a unique number-letter series. Paste the URL into the tag editor’s link field and you’re set!

 

Wait, there’s more!

We have also released support for ThingLink image tagging, which means that you can tag ThingLink images with other ThingLink images. This makes it possible to create chains of tagged images for other users to explore. You’re able to create ThingLink image tags from any other ThingLink user’s tagged images.

Additionally, we’ve updated our tagging editor so that you can now easily share the image straight to Facebook’s Timeline once you’ve tagged it. Enable Facebook sharing from the editor by clicking “Activate sharing” and logging in. Check or uncheck the sharing option and click save. It couldn’t be easier than that.

 

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ThingLink Ramps Up PR Photos

Originally published by O’Dwyer PR.

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Digital PR photos can be enhanced to include links and other content through an expanding service called ThingLink.

Neil Vineberg, the veteran PR pro who is chief marketing officer of Finland-based ThingLink and heads its North American operations, sees the service as a “generational shift” in how users interact with images.

“The job of photo editor becomes more interesting and puts publishers or PR professionals in a position to keep people on their own content,” he said.

With the service, users can embed website links, video content and pop-up info within images, without learning complicated Flash or programming. The “ThingLinked” images are then embeddable by fans, users and journalists within standard web publishing software, creating a trackable PR image unit.

“Instead of emailing a publicity photo to journalists, you can tell them to ‘take my embed code,’” said Veinberg.

Updates made to the images by ThingLink users are distributed to the embedded content so, for example, if a reporter embeds an ThingLinked image in a story, the creator of the image can update the image’s content.

While adopted early as a publicity vehicle in the music industry, use of the service is spreading to publishing and beyond as infographics and other news illustrations are given interactive and tracking capabilities with the service. The popular rock group Evanescence, for example, used ThingLink for its album release Oct. 11 to include embedded links in an image of the album cover to the band’s Twitter and facebook feeds, iTunes and YouTube, among others.

Mashable recently used the service for an infographic on the iPhone (below) while Canada’s National Post created a powerful graphic of the twin towers embedded with links to the windows where victims of 9/11 worked.

Vineberg believes ThingLink has vast potential for the PR sector because of its measurability, ease of use and ability to include information directly from a client (captions, links to websites) within an image.

“It’s a generational shift in how we interact with images,” he said.

(Roll your mouse icon over the image below to see its embedded content)

   

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ThingLink Launches Image Application Development Environment

We are today announcing the launch of our latest innovation, the Image Application Development Environment.  Announced on the eve of Hollywood Hack Day, this initiative will allow users to build branded applications and rich media tags that take advantage of ThingLink’s signature image embedding technology and Image Network.

Until now, users and image owners were required to approach ThingLink for a customized app solution to service their needs. By launching the app development environment, ThingLink is inviting developers to create fun and interesting applications that make interactive images more engaging and relevant.

Here are some of our existing Rich Media Tags and you can now make your own.

“We’re looking to empower developers with tools that engage audiences around images,” commented ThingLink CMO Neil Vineberg. “We also invite corporations and small businesses to build a presence on the ThingLink Image Network by creating branded applications and promotional content for their services.”

Prospective developers should visit www.thinglink.com/developer, where after a simple sign-in and approval process, ThingLink will provide instructions and access to sample code from a custom built app, including performance suggestions and compatibility and design tips.

First announced in June this year, ThingLink has brought a new dimension to images on the web via Rich Media Tags, transforming static images into navigational platforms. From hand-drawn artwork to professional photography, Rich Media Tags can be applied to any image, enabling the embedding of links from some of the world’s leading social content platforms such as YouTube, Spotify, Wikipedia, Twitter, Flickr, Facebook and many more.

For more information on creating Rich Media Tags or to learn more about opportunities to integrate with ThingLink, visit: www.thinglink.com.

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